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You opened a Namyats 4 or 4


A number of variations on the Namyats convention and on the possible schemes of responses were discussed in earlier sections.


This page confines itself to the continuations following two specific forms of response which must already have been agreed as the partnership method.


The intermediate bid is a key-card ask


Note that this is an optional agreement.

Note also that there is nothing to stop you treating this the same as standard Blackwood or RKCB if that makes your life easier.


The exact application of the idea which follows will depend on the exact agreement regarding the original Namyats bid.

If for example the original bid guarantees either the ace and king of the implied trump suit or one of these cards together with an outside ace then there will only be three further key cards.

If on the other hand the original bid guarantees at least one of the top two cards in the trump suit but the outside holding might only be a king then there will a further four key-cards to account for.


In either case the usual key-card responses can be condensed into fewer bids.


Step one   one key card with the queen of trumps;

step two   two key cards without the queen of trumps;

step three two key cards with the queen of trumps.


In the Romex version of the convention from which this system of responses is taken overcaller cannot have as many as three key cards, but even without this restriction opener should have little difficulty in jumping to a slam with such a holding facing a slam enquiry from partner.


This example is taken directly from the Bridge guys site.


T 7 4

K Q 4

A K Q 8 6

A 7 3

Partner has set the suit as spades, and his step two response promises two key cards but without the Q.

There are sufficient trumps to overlook the missing queen but you are still missing one key card.  Bid 6.

You

LHO

Pard

RHO



4

-

4

-

4NT

-

?




Intermediate and above


Partner has asked for controls in a suit


My preferred method was that any bid by responder in a new suit should ask for controls in that suit.


In response opener will show his holding in the suit with one of:-


step one   no control;

step two   king;

step three singleton;

step four   ace;

step five    void.

T

A K Q J 8 5 2

Q 8 6

6 3

You have set the suit as hearts and partner has asked for your controls in the spade suit.

The step three response shows your singleton in the suit, and now it is up to him.


You

LHO

Pard

RHO

4


4

-

5









Put this hand together with the hand below which I repeat from the section on responder’s bid.

8 5 4

7 6 4

A K

A K J 7 5

Partner has shown you a singleton spade.

What more do you need to know to bid 6?

Note that a key-card ask would not locate partner’s small singleton.


You

LHO

Pard

RHO



4

-

4

-

5

-

?




Responder’s first bid

Context  -  opener’s rebid.