M J Bridge

Bidding

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N

K 2

J 3 2

A K 5 3

A Q 3 2


S

Q T

A 9 8 6


K J 9 8 6 5 4


W

J 9 7 6 5 3

Q T 4

J 8 7 4



E

A 8 4

K 7 5

Q T 9 6 2

T 7

Hand

B2

Context

Stone v Stafford - Friendly match 2010

Dealer

North

Methods

Responder's reverse, redwood

Vulnerability

EW



Responder’s reverse

I have opened the (marginally) better minor on this North hand.  Others may prefer to open 1, given the choice.  The sequence shown is just one of many.  I prefer North’s 2NT rebid to 3, but either is possible.  2NT by North is game-forcing following South’s two-level response, and South can then choose between the responder’s reverse shown promising at least a five-card club suit, and 3 emphasising the length in that suit, as below.


W

N

E

S

-

1

-

2

-

2NT

-

3

-

3NT

-

-





W

N

E

S

-

1

-

2

-

2NT

-

3

-

4

-

4

-

5

-

6

Four of a minor, redwood

This time I have chosen the 3 rebid by South.  In this game-forcing situation 4 by North indicates a slam interest with clubs agreed.  4 from South is redwood in response to which North shows his two aces and the club queen.  

Whether or not South should then bid the slam with the possibility of two immediate spade losers is debatable.

What happens?


In no trumps North will make eleven tricks on any lead, including, rather fortuitously, a heart.


In the second sequence, the partnership must agree on its responses to the ‘four of a minor’ slam try.  Treating it as a key-card ask is playable, as is an immediate cue-bidding sequence.  You may also incorporate a bid by which responder initiates the key-card ask.


Eleven tricks are available in both clubs and no trumps, thanks to specific lie of the heart honours.

The slam contract in clubs is tempting, but a method which identifies which ace North holds is essential on this South holding.

3NT is the winner on the day.

Intermediate and above

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