Theory and Conventions

Home

M J Bridge

Bidding

Hands

Bidding in the protective seat


Whenever both partner and RHO have passed and it is your turn to bid then you are in the protective seat.


If this occurrence is at the three-level or higher then it is likely that the deal belongs to the opponents, although that will not always be the course and some of the principles which follow might apply.


If it is partner’s opening one of a suit which is passed round to you then you are in effect the overcaller.  This situation has already been considered in the ‘overcaller’ section of this site.


But there are other sequences in which the opponents’ bidding will peter out at the two-level.


Frequently they will have located a fit of sorts which greatly increases the probability that there is a playable fit’; they will both have limited their hands, at least to an extent;

and they may well have bid to the level of their fit, which is something you would prefer not to let them do;

and partner will no longer be hoping for the opportunity to make a penalty pass.


For these reasons you can frequently be even more enterprising as you seek the merest glimmer of a reason to bid.

Even a take-out double might be as weak as seven points.


The following examples fit into the category considered on this page.

Beginner and above

Q J 6 2

8 4

T 9 7 5

K J 8

Every chance of an eight-card spade fit at the two-level.

Double.


You

LHO

Pard

RHO




1

-

2

-

-

?




This page added 6th Dec 2017

T 9 7 6 2

8 4

Q J 5

K J 8

Every chance of an eight-card spade fit at the two-level.

Bid 2.


You

LHO

Pard

RHO




1

-

2

-

-

?




T 9 7 6 2

8 4

T 8 5 4

K J

Every chance of an eight-card spade fit at the two-level.

Bid 2.


You

LHO

Pard

RHO



1

1

-

2

-

-

?